Nina Gaby

Essays, art, and healthcare


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“Breaking Omertà” interview with Alexandria Goddard, whistleblower in the Steubenville rape case

In 2015, crime blogger Alexandria Goddard agreed to write an essay for my collection of women’s stories about being dropped by their close female friends, and Goddard allowed me to interview her for the anthology. Had it not been for Goddard, the rape would never have made national attention and the award winning documentary “Roll Red Roll” would never have been made. Given the nature of the town of Steubenville, Ohio, a town devastated by the loss of jobs and self esteem, we see how it turned to its high school football team, the only source of pride it had left. We see a classic situation of shredded male privilege and the anger that accompanied it when that privilege is called into question. Goddard had been sued, threatened, and when she mentioned the essay in my book, people from Steubenville threatened to sabotage me as well.

Nancy Schwartzman’s documentary “Roll Red Roll” is now airing on PBS this month, starting in many regions tonight.

Editor’s note:

Sixteen-year-old high school student “Jane Doe” was raped in August of 2012 by Trent Mays and Ma’lik Richmond, high school athletes, in the foot- ball town of Steubenville, Ohio. She was unconscious at the time. The athletes and others documented the rape and degradation on their cell-phone cameras. The photos went viral. Crime blogger Alexandria Goddard, who had once lived in Steubenville, brought it to national attention on her blog and was instantly vilifed and discredited, as described in this article by Katie Baker from http://www.jezebel.com, “We Wouldn’t Know About the Steubenville Rape Case if it Wasn’t for the Blogger Who Complicated Things”.

The Steubenville story, in all its complications, was picked up by the New York Times, 20/20, Dr. Phil (“Football, Booze and Bad Behavior,” 1/17/13) and later by Rolling Stone in the article “Anonymous vs. Steubenville” by David Kushner, on 11/27/13. In April of 2014, Brad Pitt bought the rights to make a movie about Deric Lostutter, a member of the hacker collective Anonymous, who along with Goddard had originally pushed this story beyond the small-town attempts at cover-up and into the national consciousness.

Some might say the whistleblowers have been judged and treated more harshly than the rapists themselves. Much of the town considers itself the “Big Red Nation,” the fan base of the football team in a town that has fallen on hard times and has little else for residents to a liate with. At the time of this writing, Lostutter faces more jail time than the convicted boys. Goddard has been sued, and her reputation and safety have been repeatedly threatened, as she describes in the blog post on her site: prinnieed. blogspot.com, 1/14, Why Steubenville Matters. 

And she was betrayed by one of her oldest friends. As a preface to her essay about this friendship, I interviewed Goddard:

Alexandria, I started following you when you were speaking out against the injustices of the rape case in Steubenville. When you spoke of losing friends because of your commitment to bring national attention to this crime, I knew I had to have you in my book. What prompted you to take this risk?

What prompted me to take the risk was the absolute outrage I felt at some of the online discussion regarding Jane Doe, which started almost a week prior to the arrest of the two juveniles. I was disgusted at some of the comments being made about the victim, and the number of individuals who immediately began making accusations that the only reason this was an issue was because it involved Steubenville High School athletes. It seemed everyone in town was talking about this, and the chain of events was documented on Twitter, yet no one had called the police themselves to report it. It was only reported after Jane Doe’s family was made aware of the online evidence. The absolute absence of bystander intervention shocked me, and the victim blaming tore at my heart.

You speak in your essay of the code of silence, the omertà, but did you ever think that it would ever happen that your friends would turn on you?

I always felt that I was taking this risk, but I thought that those who knew me would not be surprised, as I was always someone who voiced my opinion—whether it was the popular one or not. I was honestly very surprised when I started seeing posts online directed to me from people that I once considered close friends.

As I reread these articles and blog posts describing what you went through, I am struck by how much the attacks on you parallel how quickly the public jumps to condemn and blame the victims in cases such as this. I wonder to what degree that a ected you?

The online attacks by family and friends of the “Big Red Nation” have been very traumatic at times. Not only have I been maligned and harassed, but also my family has been subject to bullying, and worse, as I talk about in my essay. There is a parallel regarding victim-blaming and condemning the victim

for speaking out. The actions of those who victim-blame and condemn others who speak out are based on the desire to silence voices that refuse to be silent.

Who besides the friend you write about in the essay—let’s call her Kathy—dumped you? Was Kathy the worst? The least expected?

Yes, Kathy was the worst. There were two others who were equally as shocking—especially an older woman who I was once very close to. I looked up to her and valued her opinion as an elder. Both of their behaviors were very hurtful. There are a few anonymous Twitter accounts who claim to be family of some of the boys, who they claim were “innocent.” They have made it a point to use intimidation. One account had a banner that used my nickname and said Run Prinnie Run. When Kathy posted my address on Twitter, I was absolutely shocked and as a result packed the car and my two dogs and headed for Ohio. I have come to the realization that allowing them to intimidate me gives them power, and I have decided that I don’t care if they know where I am. They would be really stupid at this point to try to harm me.

What other losses did you experience as a result of what I would consider true bravery on your part?

I left California in a terror. That to me is the ultimate loss, because I loved the desert. I do plan on moving back to the desert eventually.

Can you tell us about the lawsuit and the silencing? You do not seem a woman easily silenced.

When I was sued for defamation of character, I was advised by counsel to stop speaking about the case and not to do interviews. I still used Twitter, but I didn’t speak of the case. It was diffcult to do because I had a lot to say about the Saltsmans [the family of one of the tweeters who posted photos of the victim, but was not one of the rapists] trying to silence people about the case.

You were mentioned in an article in Rolling Stone about Brad Pitt optioning to buy the Steubenville story. What is new with that? And did you ever think you would be connected to a Brad Pitt project?

I have not had any conversations with Brad Pitt or Plan B Entertainment.

I never in a million years would have believed this case would have the social impact that it has. I always thought that this would end up a Lifetime movie, but never dreamed that Brad Pitt would be interested in the story. I hope that bystander intervention becomes a discussion in the movie, as I believe educating the public to be an “upstander” rather than a bystander is very important.

Has there been any reconciliation with Kathy or any of the others?

No, there has been no reconciliation. With all that Kathy has done, I’m not sure that I could ever consider her a trusted friend again. I don’t hate her, but I realized that I obviously have nothing in common anymore with the person that she has become, and I’m okay with that.

Would you do it again?

Absolutely. I will never stop standing up for what I believe in. It’s my nature. Sometimes it doesn’t make me a very popular person, but I’m okay with that, too.

Alexandria Goddard is the creator and editor of Prinnieed.com and is noted for breaking the Steubenville, Ohio rape case story. She has worked for over twenty years as a legal assistant with experience in fraud analysis and risk management. She is a former volunteer guardian ad litem-court appointed special advocate for the juvenile court system and the owner of Xander Business Group, Inc. which provides consulting services based around the monitoring of jurors, witnesses, and testimony impeachment, using social media as an investigative tool in the legal process. She has donated hundreds of hours to educators and others to promote awareness of bystander intervention, and assists veterans groups in the investigation of military stolen valor.

Dumped book cover

 

This interview and Alexandria Goddard’s essay by the same name appeared in Nina Gaby’s “Dumped: Stories of Women Unfriending Women” published by She Writes Press in 2015.

 

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Tashlich and these days of awe

 

The time between Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippur is a reflective time, and the term awe can need not only reflect wonder, but also horror. This year in particular I grieve the world as I once trusted it. I can’t put my mascara on until I reach the parking lot where I work with opioid and alcohol and crack and marijuana addicted people because I cry all the way to work. I spend my hour commute listening to either VPR (hurricanes, earthquakes, fires, fundamentalism and our own shameful government) or I listen to the original Blood on the Tracks and think about how it’s been the soundtrack to my own life and no other music fits the bill these days. Mostly I’m sad because I can’t really do anything besides steward my own little corner of the world best I can. Sometimes I write angry essays and send checks to The Southern Poverty Law Center, The Jewish Anti-Defamation League, Citizens United for the Separation of Church and State and I’m suspicious of sending money to the Red Cross. I keep driving mascara less to work, but the facility where I work is being sold to an out-of-state company and I am feeling shaken and worried about that. It’s the cliché that so many workers in our country have gone through and now it’s my cliché. My husband has already lost his job with them and how do I negotiate his grief along with my own?

 

I will cross the pontoon bridge and climb up to the waterfall and empty my pockets of crumbs into the rushing stream, in ritual for the New Year I will cast away my sins. On that same bridge right now a father bounces his little boy over the old wooden railing. I can’t hear what they are saying but I believe there is teaching going on. About water, about fish. And the reflection of themselves I am sure they can see on this still morning. Likely they are not doing tashlisch since this is Vermont and not a mecca for observant Jews, but who knows? On that bridge last night my neighbor who had a stroke last year holds her husband’s hand as they take her daily rehabilitation walk. They seem too young for this stroke and too old to hold hands, and they wave up at me and I tell them they look fabulous and they air pump the sky calling out their awesomeness.

 

In the fall of 2008 I published an essay in the Seal Press anthology The Maternal is Political alongside Nancy Pelosi, Benazir Bhutto, Barbara Kingsolver, Ann Lamott, Cindy Sheehan. It was the second big publication for me so I knew my writing wasn’t just happenstance but something real, good even. I wrote because of my horror at George W. Bush getting re-elected, I wrote about my daughter and how, even in temple and in school, she mattered. I wrote about other daughters, especially the young Orthodox woman in Jerusalem who tried to learn English from me so that she could go to college in America, and whose father forbade it. I was twenty years old, and now at sixty-seven I still think about her, knowing it is likely nothing changed.

 

I am rambling, such is the off-kilter gait of grief and hope. I am still proud of this essay, proud of my daughter, my husband, proud of all of us who keep on keeping on. I will celebrate this season of reflection, of Tashlich, and repost it with my wish for a sweeter year ahead.

 

https://ninagaby.wordpress.com/2016/11/12/from-after-the-election-2004-my-thirteen-year-old-daughter-helps-make-a-minyan-in-vermont/


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Original title: I’ll Give You Something to Cry About

https://roarfeminist.org/2017/05/11/still-training-for-the-end-of-the-world/

In honor of Hillary Clinton’s book which comes out today, which I prefer to call “What the Fuck Happened,” which has already garnered tons of hysterical misogyny and controversy (even though it’s just out)…I am reposting a piece I published on ‘ROAR: Literature and Revolution by Feminist People’ last May.

We changed the title to “Still Training for the End of the World.” Although in retrospect, the original title feels so right, you know when you look back and think, wow, what was I bitching about then?????

Sometimes I like to stand in the very spot where I conceived of this piece back in 2016. And while the husband still sits in his same comfy chair, the TV has a very different message. And I am pissed. I am pissed that Bernie Sanders did not shut up and pivot quickly enough to help avert this disaster. I am disgusted with the so-called “Green” and “Libertarian” party egos who did not have enough sense, among other things, to step down and say, hey lets get behind her before something awful happens. 

Something awful happened. And I’m still screaming.

roarfeminist.org   (donate!)