Nina Gaby

Essays, art, and healthcare


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About being your own lyrical essay

https://brevity.wordpress.com/2019/12/16/preamble-ramble/#comment-85364

I already wrote the rambling preamble for this hybrid piece which the Brevity blog so generously published. What I didn’t talk about, for the sake of brevity, is finding small islands of sanity in these times of grave darkness. At least for many of us, the current political climate stains us even as we work hard to keep our own hearts and minds above the murky water line. For me, I can find some peace–at times–cutting paper with tiny scissors, holding a yoga pose or chanting in my Kundalini class, or writing the perfect sentence. Sometimes contentment finds me as I listen to a patient make sense of their own pain or tell me that a medication is working and they feel, at least in a tiny way, that their life is back on track. Sometimes at 4 AM, that crazy witching hour, my little, once feral cat sits on my chest and purrs me back to sleep.

Whatever that is for you, I hope you find it tenfold in this season of darkness to light. Happy holiday, whichever one you choose.How to be Your Own Lyrical Essay_scan.jpg


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Liminal Spaces

 

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“Liminal Space” mixed media, Nina Gaby 2019

I am working with a student one day a week at the clinic. She is already a seasoned medical nurse practitioner who is now studying for her second certification in psychiatry and I mentor her on Thursdays. At first I was anxious, as while I know the psychopharmacology, in my practice I use a lot of intuition and experience. I match symptoms and medications (or maybe no medications) and try to “get” the person before I make recommendations. I’m not one to ponder long on the functionality of a receptor site in the brain or the half life of a molecule. I want to know what the patient wants out of this experience, what has worked in the past, and what their insurance (or the generosity of a pharmaceutical rep) might cover. And then it’s on to the next patient because it is always a busy day. Is this even going to begin to answer all a student’s questions?

So it is a great surprise to find that, at the end of the day, she and I can actually explore the “beingness” of our patients. That instead of rushing through my documentation alone in the now quiet office before jumping in the car to commute home, sometimes a little teary or anxious about all the stories I have heard that day, I can actually sit with a brilliant colleague and ponder the bigger questions. Some of them pretty existential in nature. As my Kundalini yoga teacher said to me yesterday, “You guys sit in the belly of the beast.” And as I like to think–we stand staring into the abyss, holding hands and containing what we can. Feeling honored by the process.

And then I go into the studio or sit down at my laptop and try to transform what I have learned from the process into something meaningful that reaches people through words or images. Art is a beautiful antidote, and here is a link to my latest published essay on Randon Billings Noble’s journal “After the Art”:

https://aftertheart.com/2019/03/19/certain-imperfection-revisiting-zetsu-no-8/

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Detail, “Zetsu #8” by Nishida Jun, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston-permanent collection

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Nina Gaby: “Ways to Tell a Story,” interview by Shirley Dawson; Ceramics Art + Perception, #111

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To read more by Shirley Dawson, go to: rochesterartreview.blogspot.com

To order Ceramics Art + Perception: http://www.mansfieldceramics.com